adapt

adapt 1 Adapt, adjust, accommodate, conform, reconcile agree in denoting to bring into correspondence.
To adapt is to fit or suit to something; it distinctively implies modification to meet new conditions, frequently with the added suggestion of pliability or readiness
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he knew how to adapt himself. To one correspondent he is gay . . . . To another he is gravely reflective— Huxley

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To adjust is to bring into as close and exact correspondence or harmony as exists between the parts of a mechanism; in contrast with adapt, it suggests less of flexibility or tact in the agent and more of ingenuity or calculation
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he must divine what men would welcome and shun what men might resent. He must delicately mold and adjust the popular will to his own— Buchan

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Accommodate is used in preference to adjust when there exists a somewhat marked variance or discrepancy between the objects brought into often superficial or transitory agreement or harmony
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man is no lawgiver to nature, he is an absorber. She it is who stands firm; he it is who must accommodate himself— James

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Accommodate is used in preference to adapt when yielding or compromise is to be suggested
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they accommodate their counsels to his inclination— Addison

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To conform is to bring into harmony or accordance with a pattern, example, or principle
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the liberal . . . does not wish to have to conform himself to any program or policy— Inge

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In current use the reflexive to conform oneself is comparatively rare, its place being taken usually by the intransitive conform (for another intransitive sense see AGREE)
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this officer, as his duties were prescribed by that act, is to conform precisely to the will of the president. He is the mere organ by whom that will is communicated— John Marshall

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Partly because of the association of this word with compulsory legislation regarding religious observances, it often implies compliance or at times slavish acceptance
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Mark Twain . . . had conformed to a moral regime in which the profoundest of his instincts could not function— Brooks

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To reconcile is to demonstrate to one’s own or another’s satisfaction the fundamental consistency or congruity of things that are or seem to be incompatible
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confidence in her own capacity to reconcile conflicting portraits of herself— Mary Austin

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the great men among the ancients understood how to reconcile manual labor with affairs of state— Locke

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In reflexive use reconcile adds to adapt the implication of resignation or of submission
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reconciled himself to a lonely existence

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Analogous words: temper, qualify (see MODERATE): acclimatize, acclimate (see HARDEN)
Antonyms: unfit
2 *edit, rewrite, revise, redact, compile
Analogous words: fit, *prepare, condition, qualify

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Synonyms:

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  • ADAPT — is a grassroots disability rights organization with chapters in 30 states. It is known for being part of the radical wing of the disability rights movement due to its history of nonviolent direct action in order to bring attention to disability… …   Wikipedia

  • adapt — adapt·a·bil·i·ty; adapt·able; adapt·a·tive; adapt·ed; adapt·er; adapt·ive; pre·adapt; re·adapt; adapt; adapt·ive·ly; …   English syllables

  • adapt — UK US /əˈdæpt/ verb ► [I] to become familiar with a new situation: adapt to sth »To remain competitive the company has to be able to adapt to the changing marketplace. adapt to doing sth »Dick has adapted very well to running a multinational. ►… …   Financial and business terms

  • adapt — [ə dapt′] vt. [Fr adapter < L adaptare < ad , to + aptare, to fit: see APT1] 1. to make fit or suitable by changing or adjusting 2. to adjust (oneself) to new or changed circumstances vi. to adjust oneself SYN. ADAPT implies a modifying so… …   English World dictionary

  • Adapt — A*dapt , a. Fitted; suited. [Obs.] Swift. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Adapt — A*dapt , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Adapted}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Adapting}.] [L. adaptare; ad + aptare to fit; cf. F. adapter. See {Apt}, {Adept}.] To make suitable; to fit, or suit; to adjust; to alter so as to fit for a new use; sometimes followed by… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adapt — I verb acclimatize, accommodate oneself, adjust, alter, aptare, arrange, change, comply with, conform, convert, correlate, fashion, fit, make conformable, make suitable, modify, modulate, readjust, reconcile, regularize, render accordant, revise …   Law dictionary

  • adapt to — index correspond (be equivalent) Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …   Law dictionary

  • adapt — (v.) early 15c. (implied in adapted) to fit (something, for some purpose), from M.Fr. adapter (14c.), from L. adaptare adjust, from ad to (see AD (Cf. ad )) + aptare join, from aptus fitted (see APT (Cf …   Etymology dictionary

  • adapt — [v] adjust to a different situation or condition acclimate, accommodate, accustom, alter, change, come around, comply, conform, familiarize, fashion, fit, get act together*, get used to, grow used to, habituate, harmonize, make, match, modify,… …   New thesaurus

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